Clinton Mentioned In Epstein Documents Just Hours Before Alleged 'Suicide'

As more information trickles out about the suspicious death of Jeffrey Epstein, AG General William Barr asked the Justice Department’s inspector general on Saturday to launch its own investigation, while the FBI also launched an inncs, as the FBI conducts an investigation of its own.

Law enforcement officials previously said Epstein, 66, hanged himself and was found in a jail cell Saturday morning at roughly 7:30 am. Previously, on July 23, “Epstein was found passed out in his jail cell with marks on his neck.

Epstein was under extra security in a special unit of Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan – but he wasn’t under suicide watch, a prison official told the Times. Bernie Kerek, former commissioner of the New York City Department of Correction, wrote an op-ed for The Hill raising serious doubts about Epstein’s suicide…

[T]he most basic question, in my mind, is why Epstein was in solitary confinement in the first place — something so totally inappropriate for a prisoner already at risk of suicide…

He tried to commit suicide less than two weeks ago and, we were told, was placed in solitary confinement and under a suicide watch.

So how in the world could he commit suicide?

There is nothing worse than taking a suicidal prisoner and sticking him into a solitary confinement cell. Common sense and any psychologist, any corrections professional, will tell you that — so why was it done in this instance?

In solitary confinement there is a 15-minute “watch” rule, but that is not the same as a “suicide watch.” A prisoner can asphyxiate himself in 90 seconds and, after eight minutes or so, he will be brain dead.

That’s exactly why around-the-clock supervision is necessary when a prisoner is classified as suicidal. And it requires constant supervision, in person or by technology — cameras.

Just days before his death, revelations about many of the rich and famous individuals who were serviced by his pedophile ring began to emerge; all raising serious suspicions about his death and just what Epstein was ready to make public.

John McAfee had a quit shot across the bow…

President Trump indirectly raised his doubts, retweeting the following tweet, pointing the finger at one key figure who pops up time and time again…

As The Federalist reports, former President Bill Clinton visited the island of convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, who happened to committed suicide after the documents were unveiled.

The documents that detailed the former president’s trips to the island known as Pedo island were reported on Friday and Epstein committed suicide on Saturday.

“Jeffrey Epstein told prison guards and fellow inmates that he believed someone had tried to kill him weeks before his death, a source has revealed,” The Mail said.

The allegations came from Epstein’s alleged “sex slave,” said Virginia Roberts Giuffre, who remembered one trip by the former president to the island.

“Epstein did invite two young brunettes to a dinner which he gave on his Caribbean island for Mr. Clinton shortly after he left office,” the deposition said.

“I’d have been about 17 at the time. I flew to the Caribbean with Jeffrey and then Ghislaine Maxwell went to pick up Bill in a huge black helicopter that Jeffrey had bought her.”

“I remember she was very excited because she got her license around the first year we met. I used to get frightened flying with her but Bill had the secret service with him and I remember him talking about what a good job she did.”

Even the Washington Post had some questions about the suspicious nature of Epstein’s death:

First, consider the MCC itself. It is a high-rise, forbidding administrative detention facility in the south of Manhattan. Its population consists almost entirely of prisoners, like Epstein, awaiting trial in federal court in Manhattan. It has been referred to as the “Guantanamo of New York” for its stringent security measures. It is the facility of choice for notorious federal defendants, often in special administrative segregation units, having previously housed John Gotti, Bernard Madoff, Omar Abdel Rahman and, recently, Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán.

In other words, it is the very place to put a high-profile and potentially suicidal defendant such as Epstein.

Second, consider the BOP’s suicide prevention protocol. Epstein was found last month unconscious in his MCC cell with marks on his neck. If he was not on suicide watch, it would be astonishing. Yet if he were on suicide watch, his death would be virtually inconceivable.

The BOP’s suicide prevention protocol entails, first and foremost, human eyes on the prisoner 24 hours a day. It also requires a strict deprivation of anything — shoelaces, sheets, pillowcases — that could possibly be used to hang oneself. It also requires disabling anything that could be used to tie a noose — vents, sprinkler heads, etc.

Finally, we are not talking about inexperienced yokels. BOP personnel, especially at MCC, are the best professionals in the corrections industry, and they receive special training in administrating suicide prevention. Who better to guard against such a horrific development?

As a reminder, here’s a timeline of the Epstein debacle, from the very beginning, text courtesy of Axios

Timeline:

The earliest allegations date back to 2002. They include sexual abuse and exploitation of underage girls and young women, as well as requesting some of the women to recruit others, per the New York Times.

In a 2002 interview with New York Magazine, Trump said he enjoyed Epstein’s company, and, “It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side.” Per the Washington Post, Trump has since minimized his friendship with Epstein.
And Trump wasn’t the only president Epstein socialized with. “In his eyes, [Bill] Clinton as a species represents the highest evolutionary form of the political animal,” noted New York Magazine.

2005

A teenage girl’s parents told the Palm Beach police that she had been molested by Epstein in March, according to the Miami Herald and the New York Times.
By October, law enforcement had identified more than 20 possible victims.

2006

In May, the Palm Beach County state attorney referred Epstein’s case to a grand jury, resulting in a single charge of soliciting prostitution.
The FBI opened an investigation in July.
2007

Email records indicate Epstein’s attorneys and prosecutors, led by then-U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Florida, Alexander Acosta, discussed a possible plea deal.
2008

A federal grand jury indicted Epstein on minor prostitution charges.
In a deal with federal prosecutors on June 30, federal charges were dropped in exchange for Epstein pleading guilty to state charges — a single count of solicitation of prostitution with a minor. According to the Miami Herald, “Among the terms agreed upon: that the victims would not be notified, that the deal would be kept under seal and all grand jury subpoenas would be cancelled.”

Epstein began an 18-month sentence in the Palm Beach County stockade in July. He was released 6 days a week to work from his officeTwo of Epstein’s victims filed a lawsuit against the federal government, accusing them of violating their rights, per the New York Times.

2009

Epstein was released in July, 5 months early.
His nonprosecution deal was made public in September.

2011

Two of Epstein’s victims filed a motion in March accusing federal prosecutors of violating their rights by keeping the deal secret, the New York Times reports.

2017

Acosta was confirmed as U.S. labor secretary in April.

The Miami Herald began an investigation of Acosta’s nonprosecution agreement from 2007, discovering that Acosta negotiated a plea deal that granted Epstein immunity from federal sex-trafficking charges.

Reporter Julie Brown pored through records, files and court documents and found more than 80 alleged victims.

2018

Brown’s investigative report was published in November.

2019

A judge ruled in February that prosecutors had broken the law in reaching the previous plea bargain.
Epstein was charged in federal court in Manhattan with sex trafficking and sex trafficking conspiracy. He pleaded not guilty and was held without bail. He was flagged as “an extraordinary risk of flight and danger,” the New York Times writes.
Investigators seized a series of nude photos depicting underage girls from Epstein’s New York City townhouse, according to the New York Times.

In July, House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) requested Acosta’s testimony regarding his role in Epstein’s 2008 plea deal.

Acosta defended his handling of the sex-trafficking case involving Epstein. Acosta resigned in mid-July.

The intrigue: “Even though the criminal prosecution of Mr. Epstein ended this morning, there remained questions about co-conspirators,” Paul Butler, a Georgetown University law professor, told the Washington Post.

Epstein led a “mysterious yet ultra-opulent lifestyle,” writes Axios’ Felix Salmon.

He also had a collection of “powerful pals,” including private equity billionaire Leon Black, per Axios’ Dan Primack. The Miami Herald reports Clinton, Prince Andrew and former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak were in his social circle.

*  *  *

So what’s next?

The criminal case against Epstein ends with his death, but accusers’ lawyers are still seeking justice for their clients. Civil rights attorney Lisa Bloom on Saturday called for the administrators of Epstein’s estate to “freeze all his assets and hold them for his victims who are filing civil cases.”

Of course, with The FBI’s recent ruling that anyone discussing conspiracy theories is a potential domestic terrorist, it would appear everyone is a ‘domestic terrorist’ nowAs one Twitter wit noted:

Me before Epstein’s death: Conspiracy theories are facile misdirections favored by people who crave simplistic explanations to soothe their own feelings of powerlessness.

Me now: The Illuminati whacked Epstein.

Everything’s on the table.

The bottom line is simple – instead of ending the conspiracy, Epstein’s death has brought new questions about the accusations, investigations and the broader implications.